Council of Scientists

Terry Z. Riley, PhD, Director of Conservation Policy

Terry-Riley.jpg

Dr. Riley is a Certified Wildlife Biologist, hunter, angler, private pilot, and amateur vintner. Terry served in the U.S. Air Force right out of high school, including a year in Vietnam.  He is semi-retired, but his wife Nancy, also a wildlife biologist, and he own a consulting business and he collaborates with scientists at Colorado State University on research projects.  Previous work includes coordinator for the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, vice-president of policy for the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, board member of the New Mexico Wildlife Federation and the North American Grouse Partnership, conservation director and Midwest field representative for the Wildlife Management Institute, upland wildlife research biologist for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, and wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service.  Terry has a Bachelor’s degree in Fish and Wildlife Biology from Kansas State University, a Master’s degreein Wildlife Science from New Mexico State University (where he studied the ecology of lesser prairie-chickens), and a Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Zoology from The Ohio State University, where he studied the ecology of wetland invertebrates and waterfowl.  Terry and Nancy live in Fort Collins, CO with their horses and dogs.  They have 3 children; Jason is an assistant professor of business at Sam Houston State University, Samantha is a visiting assistant professor in business writing at Pennsylvania State University and Anna lives and works with an event center in Bozeman, MT.

Pertinent Publications

  • Riley, T. Z., E. M. Bayne, B. C. Dale, D. E. Naugle, J. A. Rodgers, and S. C. Torbit.  2012.  Impacts of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Developments on Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Wildlife Society Technical Review 12-02. The Wildlife Society, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Wildlife.org/publications/technical-reviews
  • Riley, T.Z.  2004.  Private-land habitat opportunities for prairie grouse through federal conservation programs.  Wildlife Society Bulletin, 32(1):83-91.
  • Hagen, C.A., B.E. Jamison, K.M. Giesen, and T.Z. Riley.  2004.  Guidelines for managing lesser prairie chicken populations and their habitats.  Wildlife Society Bulletin, 32(1):69-82.
  • Riley, T.Z.  2004.  A Review of Energy Development in the West.  A report to the National Commission on Energy Policy by the Izaak Walton League of America, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, Trout Unlimited, and the Wildlife Management Institute.  Washington, D.C.  38 pages.
  • Riley, T.Z., C.A. Davis, and R.A. Smith.  1993.  Autumn-winter habitat use of lesser prairie-   chickens.  Great Basin Naturalist 53:409-411.
  • Riley, T.Z., and C.A. Davis.  1993.  Vegetative characteristics of lesser prairie-chicken brood foraging sites.  Prairie Naturalist 25:243-248.
  • Riley, T.Z., C.A. Davis, and R.A. Smith.  1993.  Autumn and winter foods of the lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) (Galliformes: Tetraonidae).  Great Basin Naturalist 53:186-189.
  • <li>Riley, T.Z., C.A. Davis, M. Ortiz, and M.J. Wisdom.  1992.  Vegetative characteristics of successful and unsuccessful nests of lesser prairie chickens.  Journal of Wildlife Management 56:381-385.

Cameron Aldridge

 

Transient

Brian Cade, PhD

Dr. Cade is a research statistician with the USGS Fort Collins Science Center, where he has provided statistical and ecological expertise on a variety of studies of organism/environmental relationships for the past 29 years.  The focus of Brian’s statistical research is on procedures that require minimal assumptions, yet maximize information obtained from heterogeneous data distributions.  He has B.S. (1977) and M.S. (1985) degrees in Wildlife Biology and a PhD (2003) in Ecology from Colorado State University.  His formative years of ecological research were spent investigating peregrine falcons in Alaska and ruffed and blue grouse habitat selection in Idaho and Colorado.   His M.S. thesis conducted in collaboration with the Colorado Division of Wildlife investigated winter habitat selection and seasonal migration of blue grouse.  Brian is an avid fly fisherman, bird hunter, backpacker, and mountain climber, always willing to push a little more to see what’s over the next ridge.  He is married to Amy and they have two grown children, Jessica and Sam.</p>

Pertinent Publications

  • Hoffman, R. W., and B. S. Cade.  1982.  Occurrence of sage grouse above treeline.  Colorado Field Ornithology Journal 16: 22-31.
  • Cade, B. S., and P. J. Sousa.  1985.  Habitat suitability index models: Ruffed grouse.  U. S. Fish Wildlife Service Biological Report 82(10.86).  31 pp.
  • Cade, B. S., and R. W. Hoffman.  1990.  Winter use of Douglas-fir forests by blue grouse in Colorado.  Journal of Wildlife Management 54: 471-479.
  • Cade, B. S., and R. W. Hoffman.  1993.  Differential migration of blue grouse in Colorado.  Auk 110: 70-77.
  • Allen, A. W., B. S. Cade, and M. W. Vandever.  2001.  Effects of emergency haying on vegetative characteristics within selected conservation reserve program fields in the northern Great Plains.  Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 56: 120-125.
  • Prose, B. L., B. S. Cade, and D. Hein.  2002.  Nesting habitat of sharp-tailed grouse in the Nebraska Sandhills.  The Prairie Naturalist 34(3/4): 85-105.
  • Cade, B.S., M. W. Vandever, A. W. Allen, and J.W. Terrell.  2005.  Vegetation changes over 12 years in ungrazed and grazed Conservation Reserve Program grasslands in the Central and Southern Plains.  Pages 106-119 in Allen, A.W., and Vandever, M.W., eds., The Conservation Reserve Program - Planting for the Future: Proceedings of a National Conference, June 6-9, 2004, Fort Collins, CO.  U. S. Geological Survey, Biological Resources Discipline, Scientific Investigations Report 2005-5145, 248pp.
  • Aldridge, C.L., S.E. Hanser, S.E. Nielsen, M. Leu, B.S. Cade, D.J. Saher, and S.T. Knick.  2011. Detectability adjusted count models of songbird abundance.  Pp 141-220 in Hanser, S.E., M. Leu, S.T. Knick, and C.L. Aldridge (editors).  Sagebrush ecosystem conservation and management:  Ecoregional assessment tools and models for the Wyoming Basins.  Allen Press, Lawrence, KS.
  • Leu, M., S.E. Hanser, C.L. Aldridge, S. E. Nielsen, B.S. Cade, and S.T. Knick.  2011.  A sampling and analytical approach to develop spatial distribution models for sagebrush-associated species.  Pp 88-111 in Hanser, S.E., M. Leu, S.T. Knick, and C.L. Aldridge (editors).  Sagebrush ecosystem conservation and management: Ecoregional assessment tools and models for the Wyoming Basins.  Allen Press, Lawrence, KS.
  • Cade, B. S., and P. R. Johnson.  2011.  Quantile equivalence to evaluate compliance with habitat management objectives.  Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 2(2):169-182.

Richard Kenith Baydack, PhD

Rick has over 30 years of research, teaching, and consulting experience in ecosystem management and wildlife biology and conservation.  He has been on faculty with the University of Manitoba since 1979.  Dr. Baydack is currently Professor and Chair of Environmental Science and Studies in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources.  He holds Bachelor of Science (Honors) in Zoology and Master of Natural Resources Management degrees from the University of Manitoba, and a Ph.D. in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University.  Dr. Baydack’s research is in the areas of ecosystem management applications, conservation of biological diversity, adaptive resource management (ARM), and enhanced policy and decision-making strategies.  He has experience with prairie grouse research and conservation efforts across North America, and has received the Hamerstrom Award from the Prairie Grouse Technical Council.  He served as President of the North American Grouse Partnership from 2005-2012.  He was recently elected Vice-President of The Wildlife Society, and will ascend to TWS President in October 2014.


 

Dawn Davis

Transient

Dawn is a Certified Wildlife Biologist and currently the sage-grouse conservation coordinator for Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Dawn has dedicated over 15 years to upland game bird management and conservation efforts, with a focus on lesser prairie-chicken and greater sage-grouse ecology.  In addition, Dawn has worked as a private lands biologist where she assisted private landowners  develop upland game bird habitat on their property and promoted wildlife-related recreational opportunities through access agreements on private lands.  Her education includes a Bachelor’s degree in Biology from the University of Nevada, Reno, a Master’s degree in Wildlife from Oregon State University (where she studied breeding season habitat use of a greater sage-grouse population in northern Nevada), and a Ph.D. at the University of Idaho (where she assessed the population structure of a declining, peripheral population of greater sage-grouse in northeastern California).  Dawn lives in southeastern Oregon.

Christian Hagan

Transient

Christian is an Associate Professor at Oregon State University where he specializes in avian ecology, arid systems, habitat selection, demography. His work includes evaluating population level responses of gallinaceous birds to large scale conservation effort and/or habitat perturbations, whether they be natural (e.g., wildfire) or anthropogenic. Currently, his work is focusing on large scale conservation efforts to restore and enhance lesser prairie-chickens in the southern Great Plains. Closer to home he collaborates on greater sage-grouse population level response to wildfire in the Trout Creek Mountains, and to large scale removal of early encroaching juniper on nest site selection and success in the Warner Mountains.

Rick Hoffman

Transient

Rick formerly worked for Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) as an avian researcher for 30+ years.  He conducted studies throughout the state on various species of upland game birds, including dusky grouse, white-tailed ptarmigan, greater prairie-chickens, sharp-tailed grouse, and wild turkeys.  Following his retirement in 2004, Rick worked for 2 years on contract with Region 2 of the U. S. Forest Service writing conservation assessments on Columbian sharp-tailed grouse and white-tailed ptarmigan.  Every spring since his retirement Rick has assisted the CPW with greater sage-grouse and Columbian sharp-tailed grouse lek surveys in northwestern Colorado.  In addition, Rick has coordinated and conducted the trapping and translocation of Columbian sharp-tailed grouse from northwestern Colorado to previously occupied habitats in other portions of the state.  Most recently, in conjunction with the Western Agencies Sage and Columbian Sharp-tailed grouse Technical Committee, Rick prepared guidelines for the management of Columbian sharp-tailed grouse populations and their habitats in western North America.  Rick has a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree from Colorado State University.  His Master’s work focused on the ecology of white-tailed ptarmigan.  Rick lives in Fort Collins, CO with his wife Colleen.  When not chasing grouse, he is running, riding his mountain and road bikes, and climbing mountains.

Pertinent Publications

  • Boisvert, J. H., R. W. Hoffman, and K. P. Reese.  2005.  Home range and seasonal movements of Columbian sharp-tailed grouse associated with Conservation Reserve Program and mine reclamation lands.  Western North American Naturalist 65:36-44.
  • Cade, B. S., and R. W. Hoffman.  1990.  Winter use of Douglas-fir forests by blue grouse in Colorado.  Journal of Wildlife Management 54:471-479.
  • Cade, B. S., and R. W. Hoffman.  1993.  Differential migration of blue grouse in Colorado.  Auk 110:70-77.
  • Hoffman, R. W.  1981.  Volunteer wing collection station use for obtaining grouse wing samples.  Wildlife Society Bulletin 9:180-184.
  • Hoffman, R. W. 1983.  Sex classification of juvenile blue grouse from wing characteristics.  Journal of Wildlife Management 47:1143-1147.
  • Hoffman, R. W.  1985.  Blue grouse wing analyses: methodology and population inferences.  Colorado Division of Wildlife, Special Report 60, Denver, CO, USA.
  • Hoffman, R. W.  2007.  White-tailed ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura):  a technical conservation assessment.  Species Conservation Project.  USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region. [Online]: http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/projects/scp/assessments/whitetailedptarmigan.pdf.
  • Hoffman, R. W., and C. E. Braun.  1975.  Migration of a wintering population of white-tailed ptarmigan in Colorado.  Journal of Wildlife Management 39:485-490.
  • Hoffman, R. W., and C. E. Braun.  1977.  Characteristics of a wintering population of white-tailed ptarmigan in Colorado.  Wilson Bulletin 89:107-115.
  • Hoffman, R. W., and K. M. Giesen.  1983.  Demography of an introduced population of white-tailed ptarmigan.  Canadian Journal of Zoology 61:1758-1764.
  • Hoffman, R. W., and A. E. Thomas.  2007.  Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus):  a technical conservation assessment.  Species Conservation Project.  USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region. [Online]: http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/projects/scp/assessments/columbian sharptailedgrouse.pdf.
  • Hoffman, R. W., W. D. Snyder, G. C. Miller, and C. E. Braun.  1992.   Reintroduction of greater prairie-chickens in northeastern Colorado.  Prairie Naturalist 24:197-204.
  • Rodgers, R. D., and R. W. Hoffman.  2005.  Prairie grouse response to conservation reserve grasslands: an overview.  Pages 120-128 in A. W. Allen and M. W. Vandever, editors.  The Conservation Reserve Program – planting for the future.  U. S. Geological Survey, Biological Resources Division, Scientific Investigation Report 2005-5145, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
  • Remington, T. E., and R. W. Hoffman.  1996.  Food habits and preferences of blue grouse during winter.  Journal of Wildlife Management 60:808-817.

Matt Holloran

Transient

Matt Holloran was raised on a cattle and hay ranch in western Colorado.  He received his undergraduate degree in biology from The Colorado College, and his Masters and PhD in zoology and physiology from the University of Wyoming.  He has been studying sage-grouse since 1996 and focuses much of his research on investigating the response of sage-grouse to energy development and the activities implemented to counteract negative consequences of that development (e.g., mitigation).  Matt currently is co-owner of a small wildlife consulting firm and chief scientist for a non-profit research organization.  He lives in Fort Collins, Colorado with his wife and 2 daughters.

Dan Keppie

Dan is recently retired after many years as Professor, Department of Biology and Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada. He retains a position with the school as Honorary Research Professor, and now resides in Prospect Kentucky. While at UNB, he taught courses in ecology, evolution, wildlife habitat and scale, population analyses, ethology, and science and research philosophy.  He holds a B.Sc. degree from the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point (Conservation/Biology), a M.Sc. degree from Oregon State University (Wildlife Ecology and Statistics; band-tailed pigeons), and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Alberta (Zoology; spruce grouse). His early interest in grouse was mentored by much work with the Hamerstrom’s, in combination with the encouragement from Fred Baumgartner, Ray Anderson, George Becker, and Howard Wight, for a life-long love of field ecology with all species and the philosophies that underpin our research. Principal studies over the years have centered on population and habitat structure questions with American woodcock, band-tailed pigeons, and grouse, notably spruce and ruffed. Dan has benefited also from considerable time since 1994 on invited third-party audits of forest management operations by industrial companies in their attempts to achieve certification according to criteria of the Forest Stewardship Council and Sustainable Forestry Initiative.</p>

Pertinent Publications

  • Williamson, S.J., D. Keppie, R. Davison, D. Budeau, S. Carrière, D. Rabe and M. Schroeder. 2008. Spruce Grouse Continental Conservation Plan. Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Washington, DC. 60 pages.
  • Keppie, D.M.  2006.  Context, emergence, and research approach.  Wildlife Society Bulletin 34:242-246.
  • Keppie, D.M.  2004.  Autumn dispersal and winter residency do not confer reproductive advantage for juvenile female spruce grouse. Condor
  • 106:897-905.
  • Keppie, D.M., and Kierstead, J.M.  2003.  The need to improve our attention to scale of resolution in grouse research. Wildlife Biology 9:319-325.
  • Keppie, D.M., and Braun, C.E.  2000.  Band-tailed Pigeon (Columba fasciata).  In The Birds of North America, No. 530 (A. Poole and F. Gill, eds.).  The Birds of North America, Inc., Philadelphia, PA.
  • Hewitt, D.G., Keppie, D.M., and Stauffer, D.F.  2000.  Predation effects on forest grouse recruitment.  Wildlife Society Bulletin 29:16-23.
  • Keppie, D.M.  2000.  Spruce grouse: a non-gregarious and sparsely distributed forest bird, shows synchronous nesting.  Oecologia 123:490-496.

Stephanie Manes

Transient

Stephanie holds undergraduate and master’s degrees in Wildlife Ecology and Management and Rangeland Ecology from Oklahoma State University (1999), and has been a professional member of The Wildlife Society and Society for Range Management for 20 years.

Between 1999 and 2007, she was employed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as the lead biologist overseeing the national status of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken. In that capacity, Stephanie coordinated multi-state and local recovery efforts for multiple grassland species under the Service’s High Plains Partnership Initiative. She has extensive experience negotiating and delivering financial incentives to private ranchers to implement grazing management and prescribed burning plans, and has delivered habitat restoration plans for over 30,000 acres in Oklahoma and Kansas. In addition to co-authoring and collaborating on research papers on eastern wild turkeys, white-tailed deer, wood stork, wolverine, and prairie-chicken, Stephanie has been a key player of the North American Grouse Partnership for many years. Stephanie has been employed by the Ranchland Trust of Kansas, Inc. as the coordinator of the first Prairie Chicken voluntary conservation offset project for a wind energy facility in the nation. This 26,000-acre project, funded by EDP Renewables (formerly Horizon Wind Energy), is located in the Smoky Hills of Central Kansas. Stephanie resides in rural Wamego, Kansas with her husband, son and daughter.

Gary W. Norman

Transient

Gary received a B.S. degree in Wildlife Sciences at West Virginia University and a M.S. at Virginia Tech in 1980.  Gary’s Master’s thesis dealt with the nutritional ecology of ruffed grouse in southwest Virginia.  Gary served as leader of the Appalachian Cooperative Grouse Research Project (ACGRP).  The primary objective of the study was to determine if hunting, particularly late season hunting, impacted population growth rates.  Beyond hunting, the project investigated many aspects of ruffed grouse ecology and management.  The ACGRP was a cooperative project involving 8 states working at 12 sites with coordinated objectives shared by 7 universities and 18 graduate students.  Over the 6-year study more than 3,100 grouse were trapped, radio-tagged, and monitored by movement, habitat use, mortatlity and other factors.  Results of this multi-facited  grouse project have resulted in a significant amount on new information on grouse in the Appalachians and can be found in various professional manuscripts and a monograph.  A semi-technical book of the project: Ecology and Management of Ruffed Grouse in the Appalachians, edited by D. Stauffer, J. Edwards, G. Norman, and B. Giuliano is available through Hancock Press.

Gary also served as co-editor of the North American Ruffed Grouse Conservation Plan. He and his wife, Kim, reside in western Virginia.  Gary enjoys outdoor sports with family and friends.

Pertinent Publications

  • Devers, P. K., D. F. Stauffer, G. W. Norman, D. E. Steffen, D. W. Whitaker, J. D. Sole, T. J. Allen, S. L. Bittner, D. A. Buehler, J. W. Edwards, D. E. Figert, S. T. Friedhoff, W. M. Giuliano, C. A. Harper, W. K. Igo, R. L. Kirkpatrick M. H. Seamster H. A. Spiker, D. A. Swanson, and B. C. Tefft.  2007.   Population ecology of and the effects hunting on ruffed grouse southern and central Appalachians.  Wildlife Monograph.
  • Whitaker, D. M., D. F. Stauffer, G. W. Norman, P. K. Devers, T. J. Allen, S. Bittner, D. Buehler, J.
  •     Edwards, S. Freidhoff, W. M. Giuliano, C. R. Harper, and B. Tefft.  2006.Factors affecting habitat
  •     use by Appalachian  ruffed grouse.  Journal of Wildlife Management 70:460-471.
  • Dessecker, D. R., G. W. Norman, and S. J. Williamson. 2006.  North American Ruffed Grouse
  •     Conservation Plan.  International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.  72 pp.

Mike Reynolds

Angelena Ross

Transient

Angelena is a wildlife ecologist with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and an adjunct instructor at the State University of New York.  Her research focuses on conservation of threatened and endangered species such as the spruce grouse, Blanding’s and wood turtles, boreal chorus frogs, wintering raptors, and other Species of Greatest Conservation Need.  Angelena is currently a co-chair of the Herpetofauna Team and serves on both the Northern New York Audubon and the Northeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation steering committees.  She has co-authored New York’s spruce grouse recovery plan and has focused on conservation of the species in the state since 2002.  Angelena holds a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Geology from the State University of New York at Potsdam, and she earned a Master’s degree in Conservation Biology from the New York State College of Environmental Science and Forestry (focusing on spruce grouse habitat associations).  She is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Biotechnology at Clarkson University, where she is conducting research on spruce grouse population viability, population genetics, and monitoring results of experimental habitat management.  Angelena lives in Norwood, New York, with her dog, Tupper.

Pertinent Publications

  • Ross, A. M., and G. Johnson. 2012. Recovery plan for New York State populations of the spruce grouse (Falcipennis canadensis). New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, New York.
  • Johnson, G. and A. Ross. 2008. In  New York State Breeding Bird Atlas (K. McGowan and K. Corwin, eds). Species Account: Spruce grouse. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY.
  • Ross, A.M. 2008. Spruce Grouse Distribution, Movements and Habitat: A Mid-successional Species in an Aging Forested Landscape. M.S. Thesis, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, New York.
  • Ross, A.M., and G. Johnson. 2008. Spruce grouse in lowland boreal forests of New York State: distribution, movements and habitat. Final Report AMO5122, Grant T-2-1. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, New York.

Alan Sands

Transient

Alan Sands is a wildlife biologist and president of Sage Wildlife Consulting Services.  Formerly he was a habitat biologist for BLM for 22 years and an ecologist with The Nature Conservancy for 15 years.  For most of his career he has been actively engaged in the conservation of Columbian sharp-tailed grouse and Greater sage-grouse.  While at the senior career level, he was instrumental in significantly increasing and directing funding for inventory, research, acquisition, and restoration to benefit these species.  With a habitat orientation, he gained extensive experience in shrub steppe habitat restoration.  He holds a M.S. degree in Wildlife Management from Humboldt State University.  Alan lives in Idaho.

Michael A. Schroeder, PhD

Transient

Dr. Schroeder is a Certified Wildlife Biologist who has pursued research and management of grouse since 1981. He joined the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) in 1992 and has continued to focus his activities on the biology and management of grouse. His research has included studies of: (1) population dynamics and behavioral ecology of greater sage-grouse and sharp-tailed grouse; (2) greater sage-grouse and sharp-tailed grouse translocations; (3) effects of wind power on greater sage-grouse; (4) conservation genetics of grouse; (5) effects of farm programs on greater sage-grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, and other species of shrubsteppe wildlife; and (6) the importance of connected landscapes on the management of grouse. Mike is also developing a monitoring and evaluation program for WDFW wildlife areas. He has worked with graduate students from Washington State University, University of Idaho, and Eastern Washington University to address specific management issues related to grouse.  He received his Ph.D. degree in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University, his M.S. degree in Zoology from the University of Alberta, and his B.S. degree in Wildlife Ecology from Texas A&amp;M University. Mike is married with 2 kids living in Bridgeport, Washington, within 1.5 hours drive of 7 species of grouse.  His WDFW webpage is http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/research/staff/schroeder_michael.html

Pertinent Publications

  • Lyons, E. K., M. A. Schroeder, and L. A. Robb.  2012.  Criteria for determining sex and age of birds and mammals.  Chapter 8 in N. J. Silvy, Ed.  The wildlife techniques manual.  Volume 1.  Seventh Edition.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Connelly, J. W., C. A. Hagen, and M. A. Schroeder.  2011.  Characteristics and dynamics of greater sage-grouse populations.  Chapter 3 in S. T. Knick and J. W. Connelly, eds.  Greater sage-grouse: Ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitats.  Studies in Avian Biology.  Volume 38.
  • Garton, E. O., J. W. Connelly, J. S. Horne, C. A. Hagen, A. Moser, and M. A. Schroeder.  2011.  Greater sage-grouse population dynamics and probability of persistence.  Chapter 15 in S. T. Knick and J. W. Connelly, eds.  Greater sage-grouse: Ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitats.  Studies in Avian Biology.  Volume 38.
  • Wisdom, M. J., C. W. Meinke, S. T. Knick, and M. A. Schroeder.  2011.  Factors associated with extirpation of sage grouse.  Chapter 18 in S. T. Knick and J. W. Connelly, eds.  Greater sage-grouse: Ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitats.  Studies in Avian Biology.  Volume 38.
  • Schroeder, M. A., and M. Vander Haegen.  2011.  Response of greater sage-grouse to the Conservation Reserve Program in Washington State.  Chapter 22 in S. T. Knick and J. W. Connelly, eds.  Greater sage-grouse: Ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitats.  Studies in Avian Biology.  Volume 38.
  • Connelly, J. W., S. T. Knick, C. E. Braun, W. L. Baker, E. A. Beever, T. J. Christiansen, K. E. Doherty, E. O. Garton, S. E. Hanser, D. H. Johnson, M. Leu, R. F. Miller, D. E. Naugle, S. J. Oyler-McCance, D. A. Pyke, K. P. Reese, M. A. Schroeder, S. J. Stiver, B. L. Walker, and M. J. Wisdom.  2011.  Greater sage-grouse: Ecology and conservation of a landscape species and its habitats.  Chapter 24 in S. T. Knick and J. W. Connelly, eds.  Ecology and conservation of greater sage-grouse: a landscape species and its habitats.  Studies in Avian Biology. Volume 38.
  • Aldridge, C. L., S. E. Nielsen, H. L. Beyer, M. S. Boyce, J. W. Connelly, S. T. Knick, and M. A. Schroeder. 2008. Range-wide patterns of greater sage-grouse persistence. Diversity and Distributions. 19:983-994.
  • Connelly, J. W., and M. A. Schroeder. 2007. Historical and current approaches to monitoring to monitoring greater sage-grouse. Pages 3-9 in K. P. Reese and R. T. Bowyer, editors. Monitoring populations of sage-grouse. College of Natural Resources Experiment Station, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, USA.
  • Johnson, D. H., C. E. Braun, and M. A. Schroeder. 2007. The bounded-count method for analysis of lek counts. Pages 25-30 in K. P. Reese and R. T. Bowyer, editors. Monitoring populations of sage-grouse. College of Natural Resources Experiment Station, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, USA.
  • Hagen, C. A., J. W. Connelly, and M. A. Schroeder. 2007. A meta-analysis of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus nesting and brood-rearing habitats. Wildlife Biology 13:42-50.
  • Spaulding, A. W., K. E. Mock, M. A. Schroeder, and K. I. Warheit. 2006. Recency, range expansion, and unsorted lineages: implications for interpreting neutral genetic variation in the sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus). Molecular Ecology 15:2317-2332.
  • Braun, C. E., J. W. Connelly, and M. A. Schroeder. 2005. Seasonal habitat requirements for sage-grouse: spring, summer, fall, and winter. Pages 38-42 in N. L. Shaw, S. B. Monsen, M. Pellant, editors. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings: 2001 June 4-7; Boise, ID. RMRS-P-38. Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, Colorado.
  • Schroeder, M. A., C. L. Aldridge, A. D. Apa, J. R. Bohne, C. E. Braun, S. D. Bunnell, J. W. Connelly, P. A. Deibert, S. C. Gardner, M. A. Hilliard, G. D. Kobriger, S. M. McAdam, C. W. McCarthy, J. J. McCarthy, D. L. Mitchell, E. V. Rickerson, and S. J. Stiver. 2004. Distribution of sage-grouse in North America. The Condor 106:363-376.
  • Connelly, J. W., S. T. Knick, M. A. Schroeder, and S. J. Stiver. 2004. Conservation assessment of greater sage-grouse and sagebrush habitats. Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Report. Cheyenne, Wyoming.
  • Crawford, J. A., R. A. Olson, N. E. West, J. C. Mosley, M. A. Schroeder, T. D. Whitson, R. F. Miller, M. A. Gregg, and C. S. Boyd. 2004. Ecology and management of sage-grouse and sage-grouse habitats. Journal of Range Management 57:2-19.
  • Stinson, D. W., D. W. Hays, M. A. Schroeder. 2004. Washington state recovery plan for the greater sage-grouse. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Olympia, Washington.
  • Connelly, J. W., K. P. Reese, and M. A. Schroeder. 2003. Monitoring of greater sage-grouse habitats and populations. Station Bulletin 80. College of Natural Resources Experiment Station, Moscow, Idaho.
  • Knick, S. T., D. S. Dobkin, J. T. Rotenberry, M. A. Schroeder, W. M. Vander Haegen, and C. Van Riper III. 2003. Teetering on the edge or too late? Conservation and research issues for avifauna of sagebrush habitats. The Condor 105:611-634.
  • Zwickel, F. C., and M. A. Schroeder. 2003. Grouse of the Lewis and Clark expedition, 1803-1806. Northwestern Naturalist 84:1-19.
  • Bunting, S. C., J. L. Kingery, M. A. Hemstrom, M. A. Schroeder, R. A. Gravenmier, and W. J. Hann. 2002. Altered rangeland ecosystems in the interior Columbia Basin. General Technical Report PNW-GTR-553. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.
  • Schroeder, M. A., and R. K. Baydack. 2001. Predation and the management of prairie grouse. Wildlife Society Bulletin 29:24-32.
  • Schroeder, M. A., D. W. Hays, M. A. Murphy, and D. J. Pierce. 2000. Changes in the distribution and abundance of Columbian sharp-tailed grouse in Washington. Northwest Naturalist 81:95-103.
  • Schroeder, M. A., D. W. Hays, M. F. Livingston, L. E. Stream, J. E. Jacobson, and D. J. Pierce. 2000. Changes in the distribution and abundance of sage grouse in Washington. Northwest Naturalist 81:104-112.
  • Connelly, J. W., M. A. Schroeder, A. R. Sands, and C. E. Braun. 2000. Guidelines for management of sage grouse populations and habitat. Wildlife Society Bulletin 28:967-985.
  • Schroeder, M. A., J. R. Young, and C. E. Braun. 1999. Sage grouse. In The birds of North America, No. 425 (A. Poole and F. Gill, eds.). The Birds of North America, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • Schroeder, M. A. 1997. Unusually high reproductive effort by sage grouse in a fragmented habitat in north-central Washington. The Condor 99:933-941.
  • Boag, D. A., and M. A. Schroeder. 1992. Spruce grouse. In The birds of North America, No. 5 (A. Poole, P. Stettenheim, and F. Gill, Eds.). Philadelphia: The Academy of Natural Sciences; Washington, DC: The American Ornithologists' Union.

Nova J. Silvy, PhD

Transient

Dr. Silvy is a Regents Professor, Senior Faculty Fellow, and Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Programs in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&amp;M University.  He is a Certified Wildlife Biologist, Past President   and Fellow, and an Aldo Leopold Award recipient with The Wildlife Society.  He also is a Hamerstrom Award recipient with the Prairie Grouse Technical Council.  Nova has a Bachelor’s degree in Fish and Wildlife Biology from Kansas State University, a Master’s degree in Wildlife Science from Kansas State University (where he studied the ecology of greater prairie chickens) and Doctorate degree in Wildlife Science from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale where he studied the ecology of the endangered Florida Key deer.  Nova has published over 194 scientific journal papers, 58 refereed proceeding, and 16 book chapters, and edited 3 books (including the 2 volume 7th edition of TWS’s Techniques Manual) and 2 Proceedings.  He has graduated 104 graduate students that he has chaired or co-chaired and has been the recipient of 69 academic or professional awards and honors.

Pertinent Publications (sample of over 60 publications)

  • Silvy, N. J., and R. J. Robel.  1967.  Recordings used to help trap booming greater prairie chicken.  Journal of Wildlife Management 31:370 373.
  • Silvy, N. J., and R. J. Robel.  1968.  Mist nets and cannon nets compared for capturing prairie chickens on booming grounds.  Journal of Wildlife Management 32:175 178.
  • Silvy, N. J., and C. A. Hagen.  2004.  Introduction:  management of imperiled prairie grouse species and their habitat.  Wildlife Society Bulletin 32:2–5.
  • Silvy, N. J., M. J. Peterson, and R. R. Lopez.  2004.  The cause of the decline of pinnated grouse:  the Texas example.  Wildlife Society Bulletin 32:16–21.
  • Silvy, N. J., and M. E. Morrow.  1988.  Diminishing prairies and their effects on the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken.  North American Prairie Conference 10(13.02):1–3.
  • Silvy, N. J., C. P. Griffin, M. A. Lockwood, M. E. Morrow, and M. J. Peterson.  1999.  Attwater's prairie chicken:  a lesson in conservation biology research.  Pages 153–162 in W. D. Svedarsky, R. H. Hier, and N. J. Silvy, editors.  The greater prairie chicken:  a national look.  Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1999. University of Minnesota, St. Paul, USA.
  • Silvy, N. J.  2000.  Attwater's prairie chicken.  Pages 81–83 in I. Storch, Compiler.  Grouse status survey and conservation action plan 2000–2004.WPA/BirdLive/SSC Grouse Specialist Group, IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, England, UK and The World Pheasant Association, Reading, England, UK.
  • Silvy, N. J.  2006.  In my opinion:  shinnery oak is not a requirement for lesser prairie chicken habitat.  Pages 139–143 in J. W. Cain and P. R. Krausman, editors, Managing wildlife in the southwest:  new challenges for the 21st century.  Southwest Section of The Wildlife Society, Tucson, Arizona, USA.
  • Silvy, N. J.  2001.  On the brink of extinction:  the Attwater's prairie-chicken.  Grouse Partnership News 2:14–15.

William L. Vodehnal

Transient

Bill is a Certified Wildlife Biologist, hunter, golfer, gardener, jogger, home brewer, and prairie grouse enthusiast.  He has been a wildlife biologist for Nebraska Game and Parks Commission (NGPC) since 1982 focusing on prairie grouse management and research, habitat development on private and public lands, liaison between NGPC and US Forest Service, farm bill implementation, and outreach.  He received his Master of Science degree in Fisheries Science with minors in biology and statistics from South Dakota State University in 1982 and his Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resource Management with a Wildlife Management Option from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln in 1978.  Bill is best known for coordinating “A Grassland Conservation Plan for Prairie Grouse” which addresses the threats and conservation strategies to conserve grassland habitat for lesser and greater prairie-chickens and sharp-tailed grouse in the Great Plains.  Bill doubts he will ever leave the Sandhills of Nebraska and his dog, Clyde, constantly reminds him he needs to do something other than work.

Pertinent Publications

  • Vodehnal, W.L., and J.B. Haufler, Editors.  2008.  A grassland conservation plan for prairie grouse.  North American Grouse Partnership.  Fruita, CO.
  • Vodehnal, W.L.  1999.  Status and management of the greater prairie chicken in Nebraska.  Pages 81-98 in W.D. Svedarsky, R.H. Hier, and N.J. Silvy, editors.  The greater prairie chicken; a national look.  Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.
  • Vodehnal, W.L.  1987.  Surveys and management of prairie grouse.  Nebraska Game and Parks Commission P-R Report E-87.  24 p. (also P-R Reports for years 1981-1986)